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2015 August 20 News10

Death ray trial continues as pieces of machine unveiled

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Those in federal court got a first look at the x-ray death machine a Schaghticoke man was allegedly going to use to attack the local Muslim community.

Glendon Scott Crawford is facing a federal indictment saying he worked to create a killing machine to target people living in the Capital Region.

Thursday was the fourth day of his trial, and as each day goes by, more details are revealed about his alleged plan.

Federal prosecutors called several of the same witnesses to the stand on Thursday – all undercover FBI agents and one informant. In addition, pieces of metal and other supplies Crawford allegedly compiled to build the machine were inside boxes to be entered into evidence.

Wires and steel rods were held up by one agent, which prosecutors said Crawford collected for his project.

Recordings of phone calls and meetings between Crawford, a confidential informant and/or undercover agents whom Crawford believed to be like-minded were also played.

During one of those phone calls, Crawford is talking with an undercover agent known as Deputy Mike about the death ray machine.

He said, “This is going to be the world’s first.”

Crawford’s alleged co-conspirator, Eric Feight, was given the code name Yoda and progressively seemed to back out of the plan, according to the prosecutors.

A text message was sent in May 2013 from Crawford to an undercover agent that reads, “Yoda is done. Can’t take the pressure.”

The prosecution said Feight didn’t participate after that date.

The prosecution then continued to depict a timeline of events leading up to June 18, 2013. Surveillance video from that day shows Crawford and two undercover FBI agents in a warehouse in Schaghticoke where an unbuilt X-ray machine sat for hours.

The trio worked on the machine in the building, and then, according to the video clip, the door was busted open and FBI agents entered the building with guns drawn yelling for Crawford to show his hands.

Two expert witnesses also took the stand to talk about the dangers of radiation, specifically referring to the machine Crawford allegedly built. Both testified that the so-called death ray machine was in fact a machine that could cause harm or even death to intended targets.

They compared the device to EPA standards of radiation.

Dr. Albert Wiley said someone who works with radiation is allowed to be exposed to no more than five radiation-absorbed doses, or rads, per year, while the general public can be exposed to .1 rad in the span of a year.

The device prosecutors say Crawford was building could emit hundreds if not more rads in one minute.

The prosecution and defense rested Thursday. Summations are expected Friday morning.

Depending on closing arguments and how long it takes to charge the jury, the case could be in deliberation stages as early as Friday.